A "nutrition label" for buildings? We look forward to seeing more on this.

When you buy a box of Cheerios at the supermarket, you know exactly what's in it: each ingredient; the number of calories in a serving; grams of sugar, fat, and protein; milligrams of sodium; and so forth. You also get some sense of what this means for your health—from those "percent daily values" in the nutrition facts box. Illustration by Harry Campbell ----- Advertising ----- Why isn't this sort of information available for the products going into our buildings? We live or work with those building products for years or decades, spending an average of 90 percent of our time indoors. We're not literally eating our building materials, of course, but we would like to know if there's something in the paint, carpeting, or composite countertop that might harm us or the environment. Why can't we get that information? We can, and we should. The move toward transparency is all ab...

Full article: http://greensource.construction.com/features/currents/201...

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The green dividend from reusing older buildings:

The green dividend from reusing older buildings:

switchboard.nrdc.org 24 Jan '12, 6pm

We already know that, in many cases, retaining older buildings - especially those of architectural or historic character -...

A Greener Life Could Make You Richer

ecopreneurist.com 30 Jan '12, 11am

[...] A Greener Life Could Make You Richer News]By admin on January 30, 2012 Tweet A Greener Life Could Make You Richer Mo...

This old house: Why fixing up old homes is greener than building new ones, by @ghanscom

This old house: Why fixing up old homes is gree...

grist.org 26 Jan '12, 12am

Remodeling an old pad like these ones, in Baltimore, is more eco-friendly than building a new one. (Photo by cinderellasg....

To make such assumptions, your life must be a s...

hanzbr.blogspot.com 04 Feb '12, 3am

this is by far my most fave blog post from you. i so so totally get it.and i soo agree with your comeback - i,too go thru ...