26 Jun '15, 10am

Hygric Buffering and Hygric Redistribution

Hygric Buffering and Hygric Redistribution

Most building scientists agree that some wall assemblies that seem risky are made safer by hygric redistribution. The classic example is a double-stud wall Construction system in which two layers of studs are used to provide a thicker-than-normal wall system so that a lot of insulation can be installed; the two walls are often separated by several inches to reduce thermal bridging through the studs and to provide additional space for insulation. insulated with dense-packed cellulose. In a cold climate, moisture tends to accumulate on the cold side of this type of wall during the winter months, leading to damp wall sheathing. Yet when these walls are disassembled and inspected, the wall sheathing is almost always in good shape. The lack of mold or rot is often attributed to two factors: hygric redistribution by the cellulose (which pulls moisture from the sheathing and redi...

Full article: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/articles/dept/musings...

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